Program

 

8 a.m. — Registration and coffee | Great Hall

8:20 a.m. — Opening remarks | Anupma Prakash, provost, UAF

 

 

Climate change is a potential driver of zoonotic disease threats across the circumpolar North. The use of antimicrobials and the resultant development of resistance to them is becoming a global issue. This session will look at One Health approaches to prioritizing, understanding and managing these problems.

Location: Davis Concert Hall

8:30 a.m.  KEYNOTE: Emily Jenkins | Department of Veterinary Microbiology, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

The Canadian Arctic One Health Network

Strong connections among the land, wildlife and people in the North necessitate a One Health approach to address complex challenges at the interface of human, animal and ecosystem health. The North continues to face health disparities and food and water insecurity, and is now experiencing climate change at rates faster and greater than the global average. Infectious diseases will emerge in a future of climate change, and zoonoses (both old and new) continue to pose threats to wildlife and public health. Through a network of researchers and community partners, we monitor, model and mitigate One Health threats, including rabies, foodborne parasites and vector-borne diseases.

Brief 10-minute presentations | Lead presenter listed below

8:50 a.m.

Human seroprevalence to eleven zoonotic pathogens in the US Arctic, Alaska
Michael Bruce | Center for Disease Control

9 a.m. 

Priority zoonotic diseases for One Health collaboration in Alaska
Tom Hennessy | University of Alaska Anchorage

9:10 a.m.

Comparison of ecological niches of rabies in Alaska and Canada for public health: Urbanized outbreak clusters dominate in the landscape of Northern America
Falk HuettmannUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks

9:20 a.m.

Avian influenza in a changing Arctic climate
Peter Rabinowitz | CHanGE, University of Washington

9:30 a.m.

Isolation of multidrug-resistant bacterium in urban wildlife. What is in your backyard?
Grace Leu-Burke University of Alaska Anchorage

9:40 a.m.

Recovering the resistome: Genomics of antimicrobial resistance in Interior Alaska
Devin DrownUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks

9:50 a.m.

One Health AMR surveillance in the Salish Sea and surrounding areas
Peter RabinowitzCenter for One Health Research, University of Washington

 10 a.m.

Questions and answers

 

 

 
 

 

Many if not most of the communities in the circumpolar North are at risk of being food insecure. This is true for both small isolated subsistence communities and larger urban areas. This session will examine these issues through a One Health lens to explore root causes and seek to develop sustainable solutions.

Location: Davis Concert Hall

10:50 a.m.  KEYNOTE: Brooke Woods | fisheries policy analyst and outreach coordinator, Tanana Chiefs Conference

 

Brief 10-minute presentations | Lead presenter listed below

11:00 a.m. 

Where will you keep it fresh, and how will you put it up?
Art Nash | University of Alaska

11:10 a.m.

Food, culture and change in environment
Gert MulvadUniversity of Greenland Ilisimatusarfik

11:20 a.m.

Malignant transformation of tapeworms infecting rock ptarmigan in Iceland: Case study for food safety of Arctic wild meat
David Bruce ConnHarvard University Museum of Comparative Zoology and Berry College One Health Center

11:30 a.m.

Profiles of paralytic shellfish toxins and correlations to phytoplankton blooms in Southeast Alaska communities
Savannah MillerThe University of North Carolina at Wilmington

 11:40 a.m.

One Health in the Bush — An overview of One Health issues concerning residents of Northwest Alaska
Claudia IhlUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks, Northwest Campus, Nome

 11:50 a.m.

Survey of potato diseases, Alaska food security and export market prospects
Jenifer Huang McBeathUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks

12:00 p.m.

Question and answers

  

SIDE MEETINGS during lunch break

12:30 p.m. — Center for One Health Research working groups | Location: Wood Center, rooms CD/EF

12:30 p.m. — Student/presenter round table discussion | Location: Wood Center, Ballroom

Facilitated classes each day for registered students to meet and talk with the keynote speakers of that day. This gives the students time with the speakers in an environment where they feel free to ask questions about their talks.
 
Michael Castellini, UAF dean of the graduate school, will lead the meetings along with a a team of BLaST RAMPs (Research Advising and Mentoring Professionals) who are already trained in student success, career advising and One Health issues.

  

 
 

Education and communication is the foundation for development and success. These speakers will discuss how a One Health approach can be integrated into the K-12 and postsecondary education system to support students throughout the circumpolar North. Science communication doesn’t stop in school, and scientists are often challenged to communicate their findings in ways that lay audiences can understand. Strategies for understanding the challenges and improving communication will be presented in this session. Speakers will also discuss the importance of properly communicating science-related topics among all populations of people.

Location: Davis Concert Hall

1:30 p.m. KEYNOTES: 

Marit Honerod Hoveid | professor, Department of Education and Lifelong Learning, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway

Halvor Hoveid | professor, Department of Teacher Education, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway

Sustainable knowledge — Making education meaningful for the next generation

What counts as knowledge for students in education? The role education can play in terms of developing a sustainable future has to take into account what counts as knowledge for students. Making education meaningful requires that the knowledge students work with also makes sense for them in their local contexts. This talk will address some epistemological questions in relation to knowledge in education and exemplify with a project that has been developed in math education among Sami students in Finnmark, Norway. We argue that various knowledge forms cannot be ignored in a One Health approach to education.

Brief 10-minute presentations | Lead presenter listed below

1:50 p.m

RxOne Health: Competency-based, experiential education for the next generation of One Health practitioners
Woutrina SmithUniversity of California, Davis

2 p.m.

Air-tight: Authentic active learning and PM2.5 research in grades 6-12
Christina Buffington | University of Alaska Fairbanks and Renee Parsley | Lathrop High School

2:10 p.m.

The RASOR program: Connecting rural Southeast students through community-based research
Ellen ChenowethUniversity of Alaska Southeast

2:20 p.m.

Cultivating diversity, equity, inclusion and access within the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
Elena Sparrow | University of Alaska Fairbanks

 2:30 p.m.

Teachings from relatives, land and ancestors: Indigenous science methods for One Health
Doreen E. MartinezColorado State University

2:40 p.m.

Questions and answers

 

(CONCURRENT SESSION)

 


Many circumpolar residents live lifestyles close to the environment. Many aspects of this lifestyle promote health, but environmental changes have also increased potential exposure to contaminants that have been associated with enhanced risk of developing cancer and chronic diseases. This session will explore what is known about these disease risks and current biomonitoring for contaminants, and what we still need to learn about these things.

Location: Engineering Building, ELIF 301/305

1:30 p.m. KEYNOTE: Jim Berner | former science director, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium

Environmental contaminants:  An Arctic perspective of a global problem

Brief 10-minute presentations | Lead presenter listed below

1:50 p.m.

Contaminants in Arctic human populations and the changing climate
Khaled AbassArctic Health, University of Oulu, Finland

2 p.m.

The Alaska EARTH longitudinal cohort study: Results from a 10-year follow-up
Julie BeansSouthcentral Foundation

2:10 p.m.

Regional variations and drivers of mercury and selenium concentrations in Steller sea lions
Lorrie ReaUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks

 2:20 p.m.

Chronic diseases in Southeast Alaska: Is there a dioxin connection?
Anita Moore-NallUniversity of Alaska Anchorage

2:30 p.m.

The impacts of water quality and dissolved organic matter on contaminant fate and transformation in high-latitude surface waters
Jennifer Guerard | University of Alaska Fairbanks

2:40 p.m.

Questions and answers

 

 

 

 

 

Education and communication is the foundation for development and success. These speakers will discuss how a One Health approach can be integrated into the K-12 and postsecondary education system to support students throughout the circumpolar North. Science communication doesn’t stop in school, and scientists are often challenged to communicate their findings in ways that lay audiences can understand.   Strategies for understanding the challenges and improving communication will be presented in this session. Speakers will also discuss the importance of properly communicating science-related topics among all populations of people.

Location: Davis Concert Hall

3:40 p.m. KEYNOTE: Lisa Busch | director, Sitka Sound Science Center

Science communication in Alaska: What makes it so special

Science communication is an integral part of One Health. With good communication, researchers and community members can engage in sharing information about animal, environmental and human health. But there are challenges to communication and a need for more research, more training and a central place for science communication resources.

Brief 10-minute presentations | Lead presenter listed below

4 p.m.

Applying local observations for One Health
Erika Lujan | Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium 

4:10 p.m.

Things to think about (other than running away) when a journalist wants to talk to you
Lois ParshleyUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks

4:20 p.m.

What does mammalian hibernation have to do with human health?
Brian BarnesUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks

 4:30 p.m.

The ECOHAB acronym to teach One Health connections between humans, animals and environments
Peter RabinowitzCenter for One Health Research, University of Washington

 4:40 p.m.

OneTree Alaska: Rearing the next generation of forest stewards
Janice DaweUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks

4:50 p.m.

Questions and answers 

 
 
SIDE MEETINGS

5:30 - 6:30 p.m.— An Open Discussion on Engaging Rural and Alaska Native Youth in Alaska STEM | Location: Wood Center, room F

We want to hear from students!

In this youth focused session, we are asking participants to share their experiences, thoughts, and strategies on how to better engage Alaska youth in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programs that are being offered in Alaska. We want to know what is working, what isn’t working, and hear your ideas on how to make these programs more useful to Alaska youth (focusing on high school, undergraduate, graduate, out-of-school youth). We hope you’ll join us.

 

 

Sourdough Rizers

Live music with Sourdough Rizers

A culture of its own: Hot and Rizin' alt-bluegrass and swing out of Fairbanks, Alaska. Vocal harmonies and superhero guitar will groove your heart!

Location: The Pub in the UAF Wood Center
Time: 8 - 10 p.m.

IMPORTANT: 21 year old and over only, also don't forget your U.S. driver's license or international passport for I.D.